Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

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Precious Doll
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Re: Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby Precious Doll » Wed Oct 19, 2016 6:54 am

My partner's pet peeve is when films set in the past have cars that in them that were not manufactured at that time. He always rattles these off after the film when we have been to the cinema and at home when we watch DVDs.

As for me, a car is a car is a car. Just something to get you from one place to the next. I sometimes even try to open the door's of other cars I mistake for my partners as I have zero interest in them. He just purchased another one so half the time I don't even know what I'm looking for now!
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Re: Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby The Original BJ » Tue Oct 18, 2016 7:20 pm

One of my biggest pet peeves is also driving-related -- when two characters would obviously have had a conversation while driving home (or to another destination), but wait to get into things until they land at their location and get out of the car. On the production side, this is always done because driving scenes are 1) costly, and 2) look ugly, but every time I see it I wish the filmmakers had figured out a more creative way to bypass this logic bump in the storytelling.

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Re: Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby Mister Tee » Tue Oct 18, 2016 7:15 pm

Big Magilla wrote:I've been complaining about this for decades now, but what really ticks me off is songs on the soundtrack in period films in which a song is heard at a time before it was written. That, and movies being shown in period films and TV shows at a time before they were made. .

I just recently watched The Nice Guys, set in 1977. Throughout, the songs were time-appropriate -- then all of a sudden they threw in The Pina Colada Song, which hit the charts in late 1979. This wouldn't bother anyone who wasn't alive at the time -- and even among those who were, it probably only nettles those of us whose memories are annoyingly specific -- but it took me out of the movie.

Something that makes me crazy is when a scene is shot in the front seat of a car, and the driver turns to face the camera, talking to the passenger. I'm always assuming, with the driver's eye off the road, a crash is imminent -- and once in a great while, that does happen. For the most part, though, the film goes on like it was normal. I wonder how driver safety teachers feel about this.

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Re: Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby Big Magilla » Tue Oct 18, 2016 5:47 am

I've been complaining about this for decades now, but what really ticks me off is songs on the soundtrack in period films in which a song is heard at a time before it was written. That, and movies being shown in period films and TV shows at a time before they were made.

The most egregious example of the latter remains John Huston's 1982 version of Annie which takes place in 1933. The girls are taken on an outing to Radio City Music Hall where they see the Greta Garbo version of Camille which wasn't made until 1936 and not released until 1937 when it played the Capitol, not the Music Hall in NYC. Making this extra odd is that Camille was an MGM film. Annie was a Columbia release. It would have been much easier to get clearance for a Columbia film such as Frank Capra's The Bitter Tea of General Yen which actually played the Music Hall. It was, in fact, the first film to play there in 1933.
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Re: Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby Precious Doll » Tue Oct 18, 2016 3:49 am

Use of pop songs on the soundtrack that in most cases don't add anything to the narrative or even relate to story. This is often used by modern filmmakers to increase the running time of the their films for no good reason.
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Logistical Pet Peeves For Films And TV Shows

Postby Greg » Mon Oct 17, 2016 6:29 pm

My biggest logistical pet peeve for movies and TV shows is how characters will discuss a plan to do something highly illegal in a diner, right in a crowded area near a bunch of strangers. Does anyone else have similar logistical pet peeves?
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