Last Seen Movie - The Latest Movie You Have Seen; ratings

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rain Bard
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Postby rain Bard » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:44 pm

Eric wrote:Curious to know which ones.

I used to be religious about rating on imdb, but for a while I wasn't so. I just got back into doing it again recently (now that it's so easy- a single click when on the main page for a film).

Turns out I've given out seventeen 10s, all to films I've seen multiple times, and at least once in a good print in a cinema. Each of the films not only seems hardly improvable from a formal/aesthetic standpoint, but also have great sentimental associations for me. There are surely a few titles that meet those criteria but are still missing, from the period during which I wasn't carefully rating everything.

2001: Space Odyssey
Banshun (Late Spring)
the Company
the Conversation
the Far Country
the Kid Brother
Morocco
a Movie
Pee-Wee's Big Adventure
Play Time
Règle du jeu, La (the Rules of the Game)
the Searchers
Sud Sanaeha (Blissfully Yours)
Suna no onna (the Woman in the Dunes)
Sunrise: a Song of Two Humans
the Unknown
Vertigo

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Postby Damien » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:43 pm

Reza wrote:
Penelope wrote:Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998; Patrice Chéreau) 6/10

What is with movies like Rachel Getting Married and this one: a bunch of great actors giving great performances, but at the service of a ridiculous, pretentious script that never really makes any sense, and offers characters that are so distasteful you keep hoping Jason Vorhees will turn up to bring it to a quick end. That said, the last few minutes are breathtaking.

Really??? I guess 11 Cesar nods don't mean a thing then!

Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train is probably my least favorite film of the 1990s. I absolutely despise that vile piece of misanthropic crap.
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Postby Eric » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:40 pm

rain Bard wrote:I'm extremely stingy with 10's (I think I've used it less than a dozen times out of my thousands of imdb ratings)

Curious to know which ones.

I'm fairly stingy with my 10s too, but I haven't rated on IMDB very often, so most of my ratings are pretty old.

Âge d'or, L' (1930)
3 Women (1977)
The Act of Seeing with One's Own Eyes (1971)
All That Heaven Allows (1955)
Au hasard Balthazar (1966)
Barry Lyndon (1975)
Blonde Venus (1932)
Campanadas a medianoche (1965)
Chronique d'un été (Paris 1960) (1961)
Duck Amuck (1953)
Europa '51 (1952)
Femme Fatale (2002)
Fond de l'air est rouge, Le (1977)
The Fury (1978)
Gertrud (1964)
Hi, Mom! (1970)
Ivan Groznyy II: Boyarsky zagovor (1958)
Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)
Jetée, La (1962)
The Ladies Man (1961)
Light Is Calling (2004)
Locataire, Le (1976)
Love Streams (1984)
Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)
Marnie (1964)
Play Time (1967)
Règle du jeu, La (1939)
Sans soleil (1983)
Showgirls (1995)
Simón del desierto (1965)
Stromboli (1950)
Ta'm e guilass (1997)
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
Un chant d'amour (1950)

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Postby rain Bard » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:32 pm

Big Magilla wrote:But Four Sons, only 9 out of 10, Brian? I give it a full 10, one of two great discoveries for me from the Ford set released around this time last year. The other was Pilgrimage, an atypical Ford film in which the mother, unlike most Ford mothers, is mean and unforgiving for most of the film and I might add, brilliantly played by the under-appreciated Henrietta Crosman.

I was very tempted to give it a full 10, but hesitated because I've only seen it once, on a laptop, and I'm extremely stingy with 10's (I think I've used it less than a dozen times out of my thousands of imdb ratings). I do hope to see Pilgrimage relatively soon.

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Postby Big Magilla » Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:51 am

I've been busy watching some obscure titles for next week's DVD report.

You'll have to read the report to find out which ones and what I think of them, but here's a teaser...two of them are recent treacly Christmas themed films, one is a lovely British-Irish co-production, one an equally lovely Canadian production, one a quirky but charming American independent film and one a rare 1940s film noir made in color, produced by one of its stars and co-directed by two others, one of whom is uncredited.

To weigh in on Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train, I haven't seen it in a while and don't recall much about it but I remember liking it when I saw it.

But Four Sons, only 9 out of 10, Brian? I give it a full 10, one of two great discoveries for me from the Ford set released around this time last year. The other was Pilgrimage, an atypical Ford film in which the mother, unlike most Ford mothers, is mean and unforgiving for most of the film and I might add, brilliantly played by the under-appreciated Henrietta Crosman.

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Postby Reza » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:31 am

Penelope wrote:Well, if Oscar can get it wrong, then so can César!

You have a valid point.

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Postby Penelope » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:16 am

Well, if Oscar can get it wrong, then so can César!
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Postby Reza » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:13 am

Penelope wrote:Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998; Patrice Chéreau) 6/10

What is with movies like Rachel Getting Married and this one: a bunch of great actors giving great performances, but at the service of a ridiculous, pretentious script that never really makes any sense, and offers characters that are so distasteful you keep hoping Jason Vorhees will turn up to bring it to a quick end. That said, the last few minutes are breathtaking.

Really??? I guess 11 Cesar nods don't mean a thing then!

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Postby dreaMaker » Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:12 am

Horton Hears a Who!

8.5/10

I don't know when did i last laugh and cry at the same time while watching a movie.. Hillarious moments!

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Postby dreaMaker » Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:08 am

El Orfanato
8.5/10


Sad, scary, melancholic

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Postby Sabin » Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:10 am

Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998; Patrice Chéreau) 6/10

This movie is maddening. Just an anxiety attack. I'm ashamed to say that despite being bowled over by the force of the thing, I've yet to sit through it in its entirety. In my efforts to fully absorb the post-New Wave French cinema, I've purchased it alongside the Andre Techine box set and I can't get into the thing. It's just too much. I have to finish it but it's like 'Magnolia' where I just want everybody to take a lithium nap.
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Postby rain Bard » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:14 am

Four Sons (John Ford, 1928)

Watched because I read that it was Ford heavily influenced by Murnau. This film may use some of the same sets, lighting and camera techniques as Sunrise, but it's the furthest thing from a pale imitation that I can imagine. It puts the German style to a completely different purpose- on that is wholly Ford's; various moments reminded me of other Ford films, from Bucking Broadway to the Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. Though of course this is not a Western like those films, but rather a World War I weepie set mostly in Europe, it's just as much an examination of the nature of America as anything else Ford made. The final reel or so are absolutely amazing, even if the image quality on the Fox DVD is not so hot in some of the late sequences. I'd love to see this on the big screen some day.

9/10

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Postby Penelope » Thu Nov 13, 2008 11:13 pm

Beloved Enemy (1936; H.C. Potter) 6/10

Romantic melodrama set during the Troubles, as a Michael Collins-like rebel (Brian Aherne) falls for an English lord's snooty daughter (Merle Oberon); stars are out-acted by the supporting players.
"...it is the weak who are cruel, and...gentleness is only to be expected from the strong." - Leo Reston



"Cruelty might be very human, and it might be cultural, but it's not acceptable." - Jodie Foster

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Postby Penelope » Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:32 pm

Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998; Patrice Chéreau) 6/10

What is with movies like Rachel Getting Married and this one: a bunch of great actors giving great performances, but at the service of a ridiculous, pretentious script that never really makes any sense, and offers characters that are so distasteful you keep hoping Jason Vorhees will turn up to bring it to a quick end. That said, the last few minutes are breathtaking.
"...it is the weak who are cruel, and...gentleness is only to be expected from the strong." - Leo Reston



"Cruelty might be very human, and it might be cultural, but it's not acceptable." - Jodie Foster

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Postby rain Bard » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:52 am

A Christmas Tale (Arnaud Desplechin, 2008)

Truly a lovely film. Desplechin adds a Bergman (at his least dour) influence into his mix and it makes for a wonderful dynamic. I had to avert my eyes during some of the most graphic medical/hospital materil because I'm extra-squeamish about that stuff, but I still want to see the film again. And to revisit Kings and Queen, which had rubbed me the wrong way back in 2005.

8/10


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