Coming DVDs

Big Magilla
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Postby Big Magilla » Wed Apr 13, 2011 1:10 am

Reza wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:SAVAGE MESSIAH (1972) REMASTERED Russell trains his outrageous vision upon the life of famed French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (Scott Anthony.) An inveterate habitué of the Bohemian districts of Paris, Gaudier-Brzeska produced a prodigious body of work before the first World War brought his career, and life, to an end at 23 years-old. This film pivots on Gaudier-Brzeska's passionate five year relationship with a Polish noblewoman (played by Dame Dorothy Tutin) twenty years his senior. Presented uncut in all its explicit, controversial glory,

Yet another gem from Russell. I'm glad BAFTA recognised Dorothy Tutin's great performance with a nomination.

Tutin's other BAFTA nomination was for her Anne Bolyen in the TV mini-series, The Six Wives of Henry VIII, which kind of makes her Glenda Jackson's screen mother as Jackson starred as Elizabeth I in Elizabeth R and Mary, Queen of Scots teh year after Henry VIII aired.

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Postby Big Magilla » Wed Apr 13, 2011 1:05 am

Reza wrote:
Damien wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:Yes, it's good to finally have The Romantic Englishwoman available in Region 1, but it's been avialble as an import (Region 2) for years.

Even more exciting, today marks the Warner Archive release of one of Glenda Jackson's best films, Ken Russell's The Boy Friend in which she plays the star who breaks her leg so that Twiggy can go out and become one.

The Archive is also releasing Russell's Savage Messiah.

Delighted about The Boy Friend. But people should know that Glenda Jackson's role is a cameo and that she's not a major part of the picture.

Was Glenda Jackson considered for the supporting award as a possible nominee in 1971 for The Boy Friend or Mary, Queen of Scots?

If memory serves, she was considered for The Boy Friend by the New York Film Critics, probably as a consolation prize for losing Best Actress in Sunday Bloody Sunday to Jane Fonda in Klute, but Mary, Queen of Scots wasn't released in New York until 1972.

Oscar voters probably wouldn't have considered her walk-on in The Boy Friend as worthy of a nod and if I rememebr correctly, in 1971 the studios were still making the decisions as to who would be consdiered for lead and who would be considered for support. I imagine that Universal would have listed Jackson as lead in Mary, Queen of Scots along with Vanessa Redgrave.

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Postby Reza » Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:53 pm

Big Magilla wrote:SAVAGE MESSIAH (1972) REMASTERED Russell trains his outrageous vision upon the life of famed French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (Scott Anthony.) An inveterate habitué of the Bohemian districts of Paris, Gaudier-Brzeska produced a prodigious body of work before the first World War brought his career, and life, to an end at 23 years-old. This film pivots on Gaudier-Brzeska's passionate five year relationship with a Polish noblewoman (played by Dame Dorothy Tutin) twenty years his senior. Presented uncut in all its explicit, controversial glory,

Yet another gem from Russell. I'm glad BAFTA recognised Dorothy Tutin's great performance with a nomination.




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Postby Reza » Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:49 pm

Damien wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:Yes, it's good to finally have The Romantic Englishwoman available in Region 1, but it's been avialble as an import (Region 2) for years.

Even more exciting, today marks the Warner Archive release of one of Glenda Jackson's best films, Ken Russell's The Boy Friend in which she plays the star who breaks her leg so that Twiggy can go out and become one.

The Archive is also releasing Russell's Savage Messiah.

Delighted about The Boy Friend. But people should know that Glenda Jackson's role is a cameo and that she's not a major part of the picture.

Was Glenda Jackson considered for the supporting award as a possible nominee in 1971 for The Boy Friend or Mary, Queen of Scots?

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Postby Reza » Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:46 pm

Big Magilla wrote:Yes, it's good to finally have The Romantic Englishwoman available in Region 1, but it's been avialble as an import (Region 2) for years.

I just watched this Region 2 version of the film and I agree with Damien both Caine and Jackson are superb. This is the film for which Glenda Jackson should have been nominated in 1975 instead of for Hedda.

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Postby Big Magilla » Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:51 pm

True. Jackson doesn't even receive billing, but her role is curcial to the plot. Twiggy and Christopher Gable are the stars, although the press release suggests that Tommy Tune, who has a supporting role, was Twiggy's co-star:

CINEMA PROVOCATEUR KEN RUSSELL
Pioneering English director Ken Russell's films are as noted for their arresting visual style as their excesses. No stranger to controversy, Russell often confronts the viewer with lurid imagery that violates the mores of the time, only to then follow these "shocks" up with moments of sublime beauty and grace, leaving the viewer to question his own understanding of the function of art, beauty and morality. A Ken Russell film is never, ever boring.

THE BOY FRIEND (1971) REMASTERED Working at the height of his formidable powers, Ken Russell braids a whole new layer of story onto the hit stage musical that made Julie Andrews a star and opens it up to some astonishing flights of fancy. Wrapping a narrative frame around the original - a seaside theatrical company mounts a production of the '20s musical spoof The Boy Friend - allows Russell, in turn, to explore and parody the conventions of '30s musicals with elaborate fantasy sequences, slapstick, and sentiment. RESTORED DIRECTOR'S CUT/ROADSHOW presentation with Intermission and Entr'acte, as Ken Russell intended the film to be seen. Starring Twiggy and Tommy Tune, with an uncredited supporting performance by Glenda Jackson.
SPECIAL FEATURES: vintage "behind the scenes" making-of featurette about the film.

SAVAGE MESSIAH (1972) REMASTERED Russell trains his outrageous vision upon the life of famed French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (Scott Anthony.) An inveterate habitué of the Bohemian districts of Paris, Gaudier-Brzeska produced a prodigious body of work before the first World War brought his career, and life, to an end at 23 years-old. This film pivots on Gaudier-Brzeska's passionate five year relationship with a Polish noblewoman (played by Dame Dorothy Tutin) twenty years his senior. Presented uncut in all its explicit, controversial glory,




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Postby Damien » Tue Apr 12, 2011 12:51 pm

Big Magilla wrote:Yes, it's good to finally have The Romantic Englishwoman available in Region 1, but it's been avialble as an import (Region 2) for years.

Even more exciting, today marks the Warner Archive release of one of Glenda Jackson's best films, Ken Russell's The Boy Friend in which she plays the star who breaks her leg so that Twiggy can go out and become one.

The Archive is also releasing Russell's Savage Messiah.

Delighted about The Boy Friend. But people should know that Glenda Jackson's role is a cameo and that she's not a major part of the picture.
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby Big Magilla » Tue Apr 12, 2011 7:36 am

Yes, it's good to finally have The Romantic Englishwoman available in Region 1, but it's been avialble as an import (Region 2) for years.

Even more exciting, today marks the Warner Archive release of one of Glenda Jackson's best films, Ken Russell's The Boy Friend in which she plays the star who breaks her leg so that Twiggy can go out and become one.

The Archive is also releasing Russell's Savage Messiah.

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Postby Damien » Tue Apr 12, 2011 3:03 am

This is for me the most exciting DVD news in years. It's one of the great (although forgotten) films of the 1970s, with Joseph Losey's precise direction matching Tom Stoppard's brilliant screenplay. And Michael Caine and Glenda Jackson have never been better.
=======================
Kino Lorber will release the 1975 British romantic comedy-drama film The Romantic Englishwoman starring Michael Caine (The Man Who Would Be King) and Glenda Jackson (Women in Love) on DVD and Blu-ray on June 21.
Glenda Jackson and Michael Caine get the low-down in The Romantic Englishwoman.

Adapted for the screen by Tom Stoppard (Brazil) from the 1975 novel by Thomas Weisman and directed by Joseph Losey (Time Without Pity), the movie focuses on ups and downs of the marriage between novelist/screenwriter Lewis (Caine) and his wife Elizabeth (Jackson).

While Elizabeth is away on holiday in the German resort town of Baden Badem, jealous Lewis imagines she’s having an affair with a mysterious German poet (Helmut Berger) she’s met on the elevator. Soon Berger inexplicably shows up at their house in England, and Caine’s heated feelings begin to grow…prompting him to take on a script assignment and patter.

Additional good news: Otto Preminger's Such Good Friends on DVD soon.
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby Okri » Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:53 am

Likely an April Fool's Joke.

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Postby anonymous1980 » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:53 am


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Postby Precious Doll » Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:36 pm

SHADES OF THE PAST

The Warner Archive Collection celebrates Black History Month with two culturally significant new releases available for the first time on DVD. Each film presents racial conflict as seen through the prism of a young man coming of age, one black and the other white.

INTRUDER IN THE DUST (1949) REMASTERED Clarence Brown's adaptation of Nobel Laureate William Faulkner's novella is considered by many to be the most successful screen version of Faulkner to date. INTRUDER IN THE DUST presents an unflinching portrait of racism in post-war America that is startling in comparison to its cinematic contemporaries. Shot entirely on location in Oxford, MS (the basis for Faulkner's fictional Yoknapatawpha County) INTRUDER IN THE DUST tells the tale of a defiant black man (Juano Hernandez) accused of killing a white man, and the white child (Claude Jarman Jr.) who comes to his defense.

THE LEARNING TREE (1969) The first major studio release to be directed by an African American, The Learning Tree was adapted by Gordon Parks from his own autobiographical novel. Newt Winger (Kyle Johnson) is a young man coming of age in a segregated Kansas town. One eventful year accelerates the process as the youthful Newt finds himself forced to confront issues of racism, love, loyalty, duty... and murder. 16x9 WIDESCREEN PRESENTATION

IT'S RONALD REAGAN'S 100TH BIRTHDAY...

...and we found some of "the rest of him" – his films that is. These two previously unavailable pictures reveal a range that more than makes the case for a re-assessment of "Dutch's" pre-political career. Give yourself the present and re-discover this star in his heyday.

STALLION ROAD (1947) This soapy romantic drama for the horse-loving set was one of Ronald Reagan's favorite pictures. Reagan plays veterinarian Larry Hanrahan, an expert horse doc, who finds himself competing for the affections of a fellow equine aficionado (Alexis Smith) with his pal, a writer from the big city (played by Zachary Scott).

NIGHT UNTO NIGHT (1949) Ronald Reagan stars as a stricken scientist in this metaphysical melodrama alongside the enchanting Viveca Lindfors. Diagnosed with epilepsy, biochemist John Galen moves to the Everglades in Florida to work in shame and isolation. He moves into a house owned by a widow who is haunted by the voice of her dead husband. Together, they are forced to confront the mysteries of faith and fate. Directed by Don Siegel.
"I have no interest in all of that. I find that all tabloid stupidity" Woody Allen, The Guardian, 2014, in response to his adopted daughter's allegations.

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Postby Precious Doll » Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:08 pm

From Warner Archives

HOME BEFORE DARK (1958) 16x9 Widescreen - Jean Simmons stars as a newly released mental patient who goes home to confront the demons that drove her to the insane asylum. Efram Zimbalist,Jr. co-stars as a kind stranger who may just be the lifeline Simmons' character needs in this engrossing psychodrama directed by Mervyn LeRoy.

LIBEL (1959) 16x9 Widescreen - Anthony Asquith directs this smooth courtroom mystery in which Dirk Bogarde plays a man accused of an extreme case of identity theft. Prodded by his wife (played by Olivia de Havilland) to clear his name in court, he discovers he may not be who he thinks he is. Robert Morley also stars.

THE NIGHT DIGGER (1971) 16x9 Widescreen - Patricia Neal stars in this modern twist on the Gothic romance complete with crumbling mansions, desperate spinsters, and a mysterious young stranger. This macabre thriller's twists deliver a potent jolt. Scripted by Roald Dahl, and with a score by Bernard Herrmann,

BODYGUARD (1948) Lawrence Tierney stars as disgraced police detective Mike Carter, who takes a job guarding the owner of a meat-packing plant. Investigating the threats on her life, Mike soon finds himself framed for murder. A taut noir directed by Richard Fleischer, based on a story by Robert Altman.

CHICAGO CALLING (1952) Dan Duryea stars as a desperate husband and father in post-war Los Angeles who receives news that his wife and child have been in a car accident in Chicago. Suddenly, the phone company arrives to re-possess his destitute character's phone. A heart-rending blue-collar noir-ish tale of a small man's struggle against cruel fate.

THE HOUR OF 13 (1952) Peter Lawford stars as a charming jewel thief who crosses swords with a vicious serial killer in Victorian London. When the killer, "The Terror," strikes at the same locale where the jewel thief has stolen a rare emerald, the thief must bring The Terror to justice in order to clear his "good" name. Dawn Addams co-stars.

TWENTY PLUS TWO (1961) 16x9 Widescreen - David Janssen stars as private detective Tom Adler in this nearly noir thriller. After a Hollywood secretary is found murdered, Tom Adler is called in to investigate. He then uncovers a warped web that involves a missing heiress, a movie star, and someone from his own past. Janssen finds strong support from a superlative cast.

OPERATION C.I.A (1965) 16x9 Widescreen - In his first leading role, Burt Reynolds stars as a C.I.A field agent dispatched to Saigon in order to uncover a conspiracy directed against the life of the U.S. Ambassador to South Vietnam.
"I have no interest in all of that. I find that all tabloid stupidity" Woody Allen, The Guardian, 2014, in response to his adopted daughter's allegations.

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Postby Precious Doll » Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:27 am

Can't wait to purchase and revisit all of these.
"I have no interest in all of that. I find that all tabloid stupidity" Woody Allen, The Guardian, 2014, in response to his adopted daughter's allegations.

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Postby Big Magilla » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:08 pm

Tomorrow's Warner Archive releases spotlight four long, long, overdue releases of Vincente Minnelli films: The Cobweb (1955) with Richard Widmark, Lauren Bacall, Gloria Grahame, Charles Boyer, Lillian Gish, Susan Strasberg and John Kerr; Tea and Sympathy (1956) with Deborah Kerr and John Kerr; The Reluctant Debutante (1958) with Rex Harrison, Kay Kendall, Sandra Dee, John Saxon and Angela Lansbury and Two Weeks in Another Town (1962) with Kirk Douglas, Edward G. Robinson, Cyd Charisse and Claire Trevor.


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