Mad Men

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flipp525
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Postby flipp525 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:10 am

kaytodd wrote:I hope Robert Morse is well.

I really hope that Morse is doing well also. I want Bert Cooper to bring his friend Ayn Rand in as a guest star one episode ;)




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"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."

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Postby kaytodd » Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:07 am

I thought Vincent Kartheiser was brilliant and gave a brave performance in last night's episode. Pete came off as so callow and lost in that scene right after he gets the phone call in his office. He had no idea how to handle this and it showed in how he wandered around the office and the strange things he said to Don after he went into his office. Those familiar with Pete's relations with his family would understand how this event would create very confused emotions and Vincent did a good job.

I hope Robert Morse is well. Bert Cooper is a stange and interesting character. Morse turned 77 in May. He looks like he has lost weight and he looked awkward when he was using his hands to eat at his his desk. Also, he just sounded different somehow compared to last season. I wonder if we will see much of him this season and if he will always be shown behind his desk. This is what they did with Howard McNear (Floyd The Barber) on the Andy Griffith Show. For years he was always seated when he was on screen because the effects of a stroke kept him from moving around or using his hands effectively.
The great thing in the world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving. It's faith in something and enthusiasm for something that makes a life worth living. Oliver Wendell Holmes

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flipp525
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Postby flipp525 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:18 am

Damien wrote:I also love that the Mad Men folks knew that back then you received Holy Communion kneeling at the altar, not standing.

The Catholics do love to put on a show, don't they? "Sure, you can come to Mass, Peggy. But you must remain seated during communion while holding your illegitimate son. Thanks."

I found last night's episode dark, jarring and utterly compelling. There was a pall cast over the entire episode by the American Airlines crash augmented by both Pete and Peggy's sad stories. The "Hi, Aunt Peggy!" line from Peggy's niece/nephew with her little baby in a crib in the forefront was very depressing. also, from her conversation with her mother and sister, it seems like she might've spent a couple months in a mental institution after giving birth.

As a huge Joan fan, I found the fact that she so easily defaulted to spiteful, racist bitch to be a bit disappointing, no matter how true to the times. Her comeuppance was very much deserved (and made with the very same Xerox machine she was obsessing about last episode, too). Or was she just calling Paul out for being a fake hipster? I’m not sure. I still like her. Whatever happened to her lesbian roommate?

Betty has assumed a very "alpha" role in the Draper household. It's a complete switcheroo from last season.

And, again, that pink elephant in the room was priceless. That family is comprised of the coldest WASPs I've ever seen!

Christopher Allport, who played Pete's father last season, really did pass away in real life. I noticed the episode was dedicated to him.

Loving this show.




Edited By flipp525 on 1217857025
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."



-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

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flipp525
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Postby flipp525 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:57 pm

Loved, loved, loved Pete's mother's dismissal of the (literal) ceramic pink elephant in the room. Fucking classic.

Were they playing hearts at card night?




Edited By flipp525 on 1217822992
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."



-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

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Postby Damien » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:30 pm

Everything about Episode 15 was brilliantly unpleasant.

Love the use of Kyu Sakamoto's freak number one record "Sukiyaki" (although that was from 1963 whereas the Idlewild American Airlines crash was March 1, 1962, which indeed was the same day that John Glenn was ticker-taped in New York City).

I also love that the Mad Men folks knew that back then you received Holy Communion kneeling at the altar, not standing.




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"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby danfrank » Fri Aug 01, 2008 5:11 pm

Imdb has a soundtrack browser. Looks like "Song of India" is in several other films as well.

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Postby danfrank » Fri Aug 01, 2008 5:03 pm

It's on the soundtrack to Atlantic City.

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Postby Mister Tee » Fri Aug 01, 2008 3:55 pm

flipp525 wrote:
Mister Tee wrote:Can anyone identify the music that played when Betty made her entrance at the hotel? I recognized it from somewhere; my impulse was it was from something Fellini, but I'd love to know for sure.

Tee, it was Rimsky-Korsakov's "Song of India" a.k.a. "Song of the Indian Guest".

Thanks; I'd never have got that on my own. Do you know if it's ever been used in some other film/television? I know I've heard it somewhere.

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Postby Damien » Fri Aug 01, 2008 2:47 pm

From the NY Post's Page Six:

August 1, 2008 --

JON Hamm hates having to degrade women on "Mad Men." The chiseled hunk, who plays sex-crazed chauvinist Don Draper, tells Page Six magazine in this Sunday's Post, "I was raised by a single mom and am surrounded by strong women, so seeing females treated as nothing more than ornaments or toys doesn't sit well with me. But it's very true to life in the '60s." He adds that becoming his character is "all in the wardrobe. I put on the suit, slick back my hair, and suddenly I'm a megalomaniacal bastard."
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby flipp525 » Fri Aug 01, 2008 2:20 pm

Mister Tee wrote:Can anyone identify the music that played when Betty made her entrance at the hotel? I recognized it from somewhere; my impulse was it was from something Fellini, but I'd love to know for sure.

Tee, it was Rimsky-Korsakov's "Song of India" a.k.a. "Song of the Indian Guest".




Edited By flipp525 on 1217618524
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."



-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

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Postby Mister Tee » Wed Jul 30, 2008 11:28 am

Late weighing in.

Can anyone identify the music that played when Betty made her entrance at the hotel? I recognized it from somewhere; my impulse was it was from something Fellini, but I'd love to know for sure.

What Mad Men has now that it didn't last season is the burden of expectation. Having waited nearly a year for its resumption, I found myself on edge at the beginning -- waiting to be bowled over by it as I was last year, and having a little difficulty processing both the 18-month narrative time gap and the plethora of new or enhanced story lines being thrown out. (My wife was also getting sick during our watching, so I may have been distracted) It took me till the last 15 minutes to get truly grounded...but the double whammy of Betty's dangerous flirtation with the tow truck guy, and then Don's final mystery mailing (I assume to Rachwel, but of course I don't gruly know) at last brought me fully on board.

But alot of it still went by fast, and I think kaytodd is right to suggest multiple viewings. I was guessing that the woman Sal was sitting with was his mother...but others have informed me she was wearing a ring, and that the credits list her as his wife. Guess he rushed into a panic marriage...which is something I'd rather have grasped in real time rather than second hand.

Still, of course, essential viewing. Amazing such a vital show is on the otherwise dreadful AMC.




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Postby kaytodd » Wed Jul 30, 2008 9:59 am

flipp525 wrote:Peggy has assumed a new role in the office and is still trying to maintain her own identity in a male-dominated workplace. Her exchange with Don's new secretary was a nice nod to a simliar scene between her and Joan the previous season. That scene where Pete asked her if she'd ever like to have kids was heartbreaking and chilling at the same time, knowing what happened to her the last episode.

I am sure other Mad Men fans on this board noticed this, but there was more than meets the eye when Pete Campbell asked Peggy if she wanted to have kids some day. I wonder if he suspects he fathered her child and was fishing for information by seeing her reaction when he asked that question.

Earlier in the episode, a few of the guys were speculating about Peggy. One said Draper must have knocked her up and she went off to have the baby. She was gone a couple of months and she returns with a promotion. If I remember correctly (I will be able to confirm this because I watch Mad Men reruns whenever I can), Pete said, with a wide-eyed look, "She went to a fat farm. It was confirmed."

Peggy's promotion after her absence raises interesting issues. I wonder if anyone else at the firm knows about Pete and Peggy's trysts, the baby, and the shabby way he treated her.

Just one of many potential great plot lines brought up in Sunday's show.
The great thing in the world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving. It's faith in something and enthusiasm for something that makes a life worth living. Oliver Wendell Holmes

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Postby flipp525 » Mon Jul 28, 2008 3:00 pm

Damien wrote:One of the great things about the show is the subtle treatment of race. African-Americans being relegated to being silent elevator operators and nannies who walk home at night. The one relatviely upscale position was Xerox technician.

I love your anecdote, Damien.

Thinking about the episode further, I thought it was revealing how there were several small scenes that showed people of color making choices and standing up for themselves. The Xerox delivery man was insistent that the machine be properly delivered. And the Drapers' maid made a very clear decision to walk home on her own when she noticed that Don had been drinking.

The man who played the tow-truck guy was very well cast. He seemed to recognize and even acknowledge the danger that Betty was putting herself into. Without words, I very clearly saw him give a "you're lucky it's me that you're doing this with, otherwise you might've gotten yourself into trouble" sort of look.

Also, I suppose I didn't realize that Xerox machines had arrived on the scene this early. I never thought about it, but I assumed they were more an advent of the mid-to-late 70's. When I was in first grade (around 1984), we had mimeographed worksheets with the purple ink.




Edited By flipp525 on 1217276054
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."



-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

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Postby Damien » Mon Jul 28, 2008 9:25 am

You've summed up my thoughts on the terrific episode perfectly, Flipp. Jackie's Tour of the White House was a brilliant unifying device to convey verious attitudes of the charactyers as well as wonderfully conveying the essence of the era.

I also loved the excitement and wonderment over the Xerox machine. I can remember thinking as a kid that a photocopier was a miraculous invention -- perhaps the second greatest innovation after the tape recorder.

One of the great things about the show is the subtle treatment of race. African-Americans being relegated to being silent elevator operators and nannies who walk home at night. The one relatviely upscale position was Xerox technician.

And I absolutely loved the elevator encounter. It was funny but my first reaction when the scene opened was "I can't believe that creep has his hat on." But I speak from personal experience. Back in this same period, my parents returned from a weekend in New York City, where they stayed at the Algonquin. My Dad couldn't stop going on in disgust about how John Carradine had been in the elevator and hadn't removed his hat in my Mom's presence.
"Y'know, that's one of the things I like about Mitt Romney. He's been consistent since he changed his mind." -- Christine O'Donnell

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Postby flipp525 » Mon Jul 28, 2008 8:28 am

What a fantastic episode! Slow, measured pace and a good re-introduction to the characters. I liked how enough time has gone by that we can see some of the changes in the characters, but many of the same issues are still present. For example, Sal appears to be married now, yet clearly still has issues with his sexuality. He kept complaining that JFK was not a part of the White House tour TV special! I seem to recall him expressing jealousy toward Jackie O last season, so I think he might have a little crush on the president.

Peggy has assumed a new role in the office and is still trying to maintain her own identity in a male-dominated workplace. Her exchange with Don's new secretary was a nice nod to a simliar scene between her and Joan the previous season. That scene where Pete asked her if she'd ever like to have kids was heartbreaking and chilling at the same time, knowing what happened to her the last episode.

Don seems to be feeling the effects of his hard-drinking ways. There was something very tired and old about him during this episode. I loved the cool, calm way he put that guy in his place in the elevator. By admonishing him for not taking his hat off in the presence of a lady, he was also able to make a comment on the man's inappropriate talk around a lady without overtly rescuing her or making her feel uncomfortable. It was classy.

The most fascinating part of the episode for me was definitely the restless housewife, Betty Draper. That scene on the open road with the mechanic was very dangerous. She definitely seemed to be turned on by the idea of exchanging some sort of sexual favor for his services. Is she going to become a "party girl" herself just for the thrill of it? Are we headed to Belle du Jour territory with Betty? Interestingly, I don't think the audience is supposed to see a whole lot of difference between her call girl ex-roommate and Betty herself.

Very interesting set-up for the season.
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."



-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell


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