BAFTA winners

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Postby Big Magilla » Mon Feb 14, 2011 3:35 pm

I think what Tee is saying, and I agree, is that the BAFTA surprises, though they probably didn't persuade many voters, were more representative of what AMPAS voters were thinking than we knew at the time.

The last time BAFTA gave their Best Picture award to a British film, Atonement, they gave their best director award to Hollywood's Coen Brothers for No Country for Old Men. This year's split is along those same lines. It's the DGA's award that is out of whack with the general consensus, not BAFTA's which makes Fincher the most likely Oscar recipient regardless of what organization has the greatest track record.

And while it shouldn't have anything to do with the outcome, has anyone noticed how eerily alike Marshall and Hooper look?
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Postby flipp525 » Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:18 pm

I have to agree with OscarGuy. Swinton was not even really part of the conversation until after she won BAFTA. And even then, she wasn’t heralded as any sort of a lock after that surprise win, just more of a stronger possibility. I'm not sure what constitutes "peripheral discussion" before that happened.



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Postby OscarGuy » Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:13 pm

I don't think you could classify Swinton as in discussion. Most people were still saying that Amy Ryan was going to win and that she couldn't lose. It wasn't until BAFTA that we really found the contender who could do it. I know I wasn't and I was one of the first people to pick up on the Swinton win and push it towards a prediction of the Oscar win.

But really, using BAFTA to help predict the Oscars is a bit ludicrous. Their eligibility rules have excluded a number of prominent films because they didn't relase in England in time. On top of that, they have split on something as obvious as No Country for Old Men/Coens. Considering they didn't even nominate frontrunner Melissa Leo and you can see just how far away they are from being solid prognosticators even if it sometimes seems they are trying hard to be.
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Postby Mister Tee » Mon Feb 14, 2011 12:06 pm

Nobody's really reacting to the (to me) surprising result of the evening: that King's Speech did both better and worse than expected -- better with the Rush/Carter wins and taking Brest British film (which front-runners like The Queen and Atonement failed to do), worse with the below-the-line decor losses and, above all, best director.

People are brushing off the sets/costumes losses by explaining that only branch members vote there, not the full Academy, which may explain it. But the fact is, BAFTA crafts winners have not infrequently carried over to AMPAS, so it hasn't been such an issue prior to this year.

As for director -- people are rightly saying that film/director have frequently shown a split here. But it's hard not to look at it and think, even the Speech-loving British base can't justify singling out a journeyman like Hooper. Is it possible AMPAS can be more Anglophile that BAFTA?

I'm agnostic about BAFTA as predictor in the big categories. It's true they've foretold some recent surprises -- Arkin, Cotillard, Swinton -- but 1) all of those were at least in peripheral Oscar discussion, so BAFTA didn't create them; and 2) BAFTA also chose Jake Gyllenhaal and Mickey Rourke, so they're not exactly iron-clad.

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Postby Damien » Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:44 am

I guess I was mistaken, I was in another room when it started and thought they just continued it. I'm not familiar enough with the score to recognize it instantly.
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Postby Big Magilla » Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:45 pm

I could be mistaken but the only time I heard John Barry's music from Out of Africa was during the brief clip shown from the film.

Helena Bonham Carter was delightfully daffy, but her little joke about the size of her queens' heads is becoming a bit much. She said the same thing on the red carpet.




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Postby Damien » Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:33 pm

Christopher Lee's award was lovely. And Helena Bonham-Carter was charming in her addled-ness.

I forget who it was, but somebody here suggested that John Barry's music from Out of Africa was used to accompany the (beautifully done) Memorial sequence.
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Postby Big Magilla » Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:03 pm

An unremarkable show with a couple of nice moments:

Christopher Lee's award.

Tilda Swinton inviting Jesse Eisenberg and Andrew Garfield to accept David Fincher's award.

and a couple awful ones:

Darren Aronofsky taking credit for "knocking up Natalie Portman without actually knocking her up"

David Seidler's senile acceptance speech
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Postby anonymous1980 » Sun Feb 13, 2011 9:45 pm

Best Film – The King’s Speech
Best Director – The Social Network – David Fincher
Best Leading Actress – Natalie Portman – Black Swan
Best Leading Actor – Colin Firth – The King’s Speech
Best Supporting Actress – Helena Bonham Carter – The King’s Speech
Best Supporting Actor – Geoffrey Rush – The King’s Speech
Best Adapted Screenplay – The Social Network – Aaron Sorkin.
Best Original Screenplay – The King’s Speech – David Seidler
Best Cinematography – True Grit – Roger Deakins
Outstanding British Film – The King’s Speech
Outstanding British Debut – Four Lions – Chris Morris
Best Editing – The Social Network – Angus Wall, Kirk Baxter
Best Original Music – The King’s Speech – Alexandre Desplat
Best Production Design – Inception – Guy Hendrix Dyas, Larry Dias, Doug Mowat
Best Costume Design: Alice in Wonderland – Colleen Atwood
Best Sound – Inception – Richard King, Lora Hirschberg, Gary A Rizzo, Ed Novick
Best Special Visual Effects – Inception – Corbould, Franklin, Lockley, Bebb
Best Make Up & Hair – Alice in Wonderland – Valli O’Reilly, Paul
Best Short Film – Until the River Runs Red – Paul Wright, Poss Kondeatis
Best Short Animation – The Eagleman Stag – Michael Please
Best Film Not in the English Language – The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
Best Animated Film – Toy Story 3
Orange Wednesdays Rising Star Award – Tom Hardy


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