"The Hobbit" is finally happening! - To go into production at MGM

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:49 pm

EXCLUSIVE: Guillermo Del Toro ‘Very Close’ To Annoucing Bilbo Baggins Casting For ‘The Hobbit’

Published by Eric Ditzian on Thursday, June 4, 2009 at 5:45 pm.

In what’s becoming something of a tradition between MTV News and Guillermo del Toro, every time we have a chance to chat with the Mexican-born director, we harass him for news about who’s been cast as Bilbo Baggins in his upcoming adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.” Last year, he said it was still too early to speculate about the man who would be Baggins. Then at Sundance in January, del Toro announced that he’d narrowed the search to just four actors. So when the director stopped by the MTV offices today to chat about his new vampire novel “The Strain,” everyone had to know the “Hobbit” question would rise again.

It did, and del Toro revealed that four possible Bilbos had now become one. “I believe we’re very close now to saying one name,” he said, adding that he expects to make an announcement in the next few weeks.

Check out the interview below to hear some additional details on del Toro’s casting decision and why he absolutely hates keeping secrets.
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Tue Oct 21, 2008 3:03 pm

Guillermo del Toro: “I’m so voracious about The Hobbit!”

Guillermo Del Toro was recently in New York City as part of the New Yorker Festival and our good pal Anthony Moody from Indalo Productions caught up with him to talk all things Hobbit! In this interview GDT talks about his writing duties with PJ, Tom Bombadil, the possibility of a THIRD Hobbit movie(?!), details about his writing methods, he discusses major themes he sees in The Hobbit, and talks a little bit about casting!

Anthony: Great! This is Anthony Moody interviewing Guillermo del Toro for the OneRing.net

Guillermo: Great view!

Anthony: Fantastic view! We’re in the Penthouse Suite at the Royalton Hotel and ah ..

Guillermo: The Chrysler Building

Anthony: [continued] The Chrysler Building and Rock Centre …

Guillermo: … Quetzaqoatl (The Movie) ..

Anthony: That’s right, Quetzaqoatl – exactly – that’s colossal – exactly - I love it. So last we heard, the writing process had officially started ..

Guillermo: Yes!

Anthony: And if I may quote you, you said “It keeps transforming and changing and it is the most beautiful writing experience of my life, I’m enjoying it tremendously.”

Guillermo: Yeah!

Anthony: What’s the latest?

Guillermo: That’s the whole truth!

Anthony: [laughs] Well that’s good!

Guillermo: Well right now, I’m travelling to New Zealand next week. We have laid out a full set of cards – 3 x 5’s – and there is I think a good template for what we’re tracking in the two movies. You know, there’s a lot of stuff obviously [smile in his voice] that I could but I shouldn’t talk about – [Anthony laughs “of course”] I apologize for having to be coy about this thing. Normally, I am just completely absolutely open about the process. But, I think The Hobbit is a movie where, or movies, that where you have to be cautious – and I think that what we can reveal – (that) that’s the layout. Peter – we’re working on both fronts, they’re working on some of the load, I’m working on some of the load of the writing, and we’re going to meet there, and we’re going to come out with a much bigger document than what we have now. Our hopes are still that in the next six seven months we can have enough of our structured draft that we can then go on and budget..

Anthony: And so, in six or seven months, a Film One or both Films?

Guillermo: Well no, the idea is to essentially if we can, to just treat it like – because they’re going to be shot back to back – to treat it like a single project.

Anthony: I see. And, I understand if you can’t say it, but I’ll ask – Do you have a sense currently where the first film will end and where the second film will begin and time lines? – That’s essentially decided?

Guillermo: The answer is ‘yes’ – and that’s about it. [Laughs]

Anthony: [laughs] Fair Enough.

Guillermo: I think that some of the stuff that you can affirm at this stage, if it changes [exclamation] it’s tragic that you already said something else. As I said in the other interview, it is changing all the time [Anthony: “sure”] and the more we discover about this, the more it transforms – but the greatest thing for me is that; at inception I was really - I was in a position that was completely open at it being one film or it being two films. I was not dogmatic about that. Now I know that it feels perfectly legitimate, and for me right now, that it is two films, and the way they integrate feels perfectly legitimate. If it didn’t, as I said in past interviews, I would have said so. And I feel right now that’s the great revelation – That this thing is told in a beautiful way and really seems to be – umm – seems to grow into the existing trilogy in a great way.

Anthony: And speaking of trilogies, has there been a point in the process so far where you’ve had even an inkling that maybe in fact that there are three films in here? ..

Guillermo: No..

Anthony: [continued] .. and is that a remote possibility?

Guillermo: No. No, I don’t believe it even on the remote horizon. Because, this, the whole time we .. the first thing we agreed upon – all of us – was that we were doing this, if and only if, the narrative that we felt was either implicit or explicit in The Hobbit - meaning you can find events that are omitted or are implicit in The Hobbit that you can flesh out, or you can you can refer to the appendices, or you can refer to ulterior sources and find out what’s happening in them. But we said if the narrative does not demand two, much less three films, then you know it’s not a real chance.

Anthony: So be it.

Guillermo: So be it. No it’s two films.

Anthony: And speaking of the narrative demanding things, much was made in the original adaptation of The Lord of the Rings films, certain exclusions that were done in the name of narrative and dramatic…

Guillermo: … Tom Bombadil … [laughs]

Anthony: [continued] Tom Bombadil, The Scouring of The Shire – were probably the two that everybody sort of most on the top of people’s minds. I’m guessing you’re not able or prepared, and you probably don’t even know yet, but if there are any sort of ‘cuts’, for lack of a better word, that are probably going to left on the floor – in terms of the narrative?

Guillermo: I think that for the bulk of the work we do which is: ‘adapting’ and obviously ‘adapting’ means that you’re going to repurpose and refurnish essentially something existing; you know you’re going to have to move the furniture. You’re going to have to say that this goes, this doesn’t go. It is inevitable that you need to. But, if you come to it from either your own knowledge of the source, or your own instinct of the source and in this case, between the four of us, I think we have it – you know, both, I think that it will feel organic. It will feel organic and it will feel respectful and it will feel coherent. And I think that whatever omissions there are as a fan of the ‘book’ because – and I underline ‘The Book’ because that’s where I’m coming from – I was not coming to this project as a scholar of Tolkien, or I didn’t know all of his works. I come as a guy who read The Hobbit at eleven, and didn’t read anything else he wrote except interviews and theory, because I really always loved his theory of fantasy and how to write. I was always a big fan of that. But I didn’t read the Trilogy until last year – you know. Because as a kid, I never got into it, and I’m saying, whatever is left out I feel will be minor because I’m so voracious about The Hobbit. You know, as a fat man, voracity is a salient defect or an inevitable virtue – one or the other [Anthony laughs – Guillermo coughs] and I’m so hungry to put, to cram as much as I can of what it is The Hobbit, as I can.

Anthony: Can you talk a little bit about the process of working as one of four writers, and maybe it’s a navigation that’s still being borne out, but what is the process literally?

Guillermo: Well the strange thing - as we got to the most - I mean I work in collaboration a lot. I normally write alone in the Spanish Language films, or I - I have even written Hellboys as a screenplay writer alone, but I’m used to collaboration. Sometimes with one, or sometimes with two writers, like in Devils Backbone. I mean it’s not as a cumbersome project as one might think, because in reality Peter, Fran and Philippa are a single person. You know they really are like born out of Catholic dogma - its Father Son and Holy Spirit, [Anthony quietly laughs] - you cannot distinguish them. I mean I can tell you where each of them brings something different to the process - Philippa is kind of the Oracle of the Law - and she knows. But so is Fran! She doesn’t think that she is - she claims “well I don’t remember much but” that preface is always followed by a scholarly citation about the Dwarves mining or whatever subject you want. And Peter, Peter and I come to it always from the intuitive film making audience engaging and so forth. The more I read of Tolkien, analogue Tolkien, and so forth, the more I feel that the task is going to be perfectly balanced because basically what you do is a ping pong. One of the groups finishes one part of the task and then bounces it off the other part of the group. And in this case it’s not four groups, it’s one - its two groups, and eventually it will be completely fused. I mean, that’s happened to me with the other writers, it’s happening here.

Anthony: Fantastic. I hear from Gary that you were writing today, I assume [Guillermo answers "yeah"] it was on The Hobbit.

Guillermo: Yeah I was. I was. I am translating the set of cards into a final draft document and sort of an outline. Because I do like laying out physical Sharpie written 3 x 5’s, because it gives everything a tactile sense. So although that set of cards - which travel with me with super secret black little boxes of 3 x 5’s numbered from 1 to 4 [Anthony laughs "wow']. It’s not that many if you sync with the way I work. I don’t do cards for scenes, I do cards for beats - meaning for example: Gandalf explains why Bilbo is the perfect thief - or, you know, part one of the legend of the Lonely Mountain - you know, they are beats. They are not full scenes. So you end up laying anything from 300 to 900 cards for an interpret like this.

Anthony: WOW. You mentioned six to seven months hopefully will you be then be able to go out and budget - is that also the time frame to go out officially …

Guillermo: Budgeting will start earlier. [Anthony remarks: "Fair"] What I’m saying we’ll be hitting the real accurate stuff in about six months.

Anthony: … And do you go out to cast officially as well…

Guillermo: We may need to go out to cast a little earlier than that because of err [Anthony: "to lock availability] .. Well, to lock in availability, for some practicality, you know either wardrobe or make-up or needs.

Anthony: Ah Interesting. And in terms of that process Sir Ian McKellen, Andy Serkis, are probably the two most public who have, in some way, shape or form, confirmed their involvement or certainly their serious interest. I assume at this time there’s nobody else who you can ..

Guillermo: No, we have really made an effort to let the world know that we hope that there will be people back. But I think until the document exists it is toying with expectation. [Anthony agrees] If you say a name and then you find out there is no room for him or her in the narrative, that’ll be disappointing. It is really, and it should be, unqualified - how you go on in the screenplay [Anthony: "sure"] You should not have to feel there is a compromised position to ‘oh we have to go to so-and-so because we said so’ you know, it is really such a monumental task, you don’t want to be burdened by those things.

Anthony: And, which makes perfect sense. And in terms of sequencing, do you see it as a sequential event? Meaning, do you feel like you need to set Bilbo and cast around him, or is the ensemble unique and interesting enough that you can pick among any of them and go simultaneously?

Guillermo: Ah, certainly between Bilbo and the Dwarves, and certainly between Bilbo and Thorin. It’s your casting, according to chemistry. You know, you’re first step is casting Bilbo - that’s the cornerstone - because to me a lot is hanging in the narrative in the relationship between Bilbo and Thorin - obviously because out of the Dwarf group the transformation that Thorin goes through, and the way Bilbo’s character reaffirms itself in light of greed and the desire of ownership that Thorin experiences once they find the treasure trove, you know, as they recuperate their claim to their kingdom and their origins there’s a transformation. And I think that you have to have Bilbo and him have a lot of chemistry. Because there are few events, there are a couple of events in the Hobbit and, at least grammatically feel climactic. One is obviously the face-to-face between Smaug and Bilbo - even more so than the subsequent destruction of the town and the destruction of Smaug - even more so. Because Bilbo and Smaug, in essence, in the narrative represent opposites. And another decisive moment is the delivery of the Arkenstone. Because ultimately there is character fortitude or a character resolution that is so strong - the fact that there is a choice and Bilbo takes it. And those events are enormous. And so everything revolves around Bilbo. I dare say not only about these two movies, but about it really resonating with the five movies, all together. So you know, I think that ideally that you don’t want to do is just - you want to cast that part for the character that ends up emerging from these pages, which you can deduct, kind of, from the book, but you have to construct through the screenplay writing process which is a very different process. And you don’t want to just tie yourself to anybody else until you have it.

Anthony: Interesting. And are those climactic moments which you spoke of, Are those the biggest challenges in the things you’re most - I don’t want to characterize these things as being worried about - but is there anything in the annotation that makes you nervous or particularly keyed - you know I’m nervous about we’re going to do that, How that’s going to look …

Guillermo: From the script writing or the Directing?

Anthony: … Both.

Guillermo: On the screenplay writing I think up until we have the goal, I think everything is pushing claim. So every single moment is difficult. You know whether you’re dealing with (how you deal with) inclusion or exclusion of something that relates to The Hobbit but may seem like an appendix itself, or how you decide to omit in certain passages or certain trait of the book, because it goes against the narrative of the movie. So everything is challenging on that because as I said because it’s pushing claim for breathing life into the volume. And the film making, I think that I believe that every single second of that movie is a challenge. The biggest of them all, the most obvious of them all would be Smaug - but that is stating the obvious. Smaug has the great advantage of having been written like - in my memory and in my view of anti-drama - it is the best Dragon ever written, so that’s a great foundation already. You know the fact that he is ‘The Magnificent’; he is absolutely so well fleshed out. But in terms of the design, because ‘form is function’ and function and form ultimately dictate conflict (to an audience). When you’re watching a Dragon it’s not just how cool it looks, which is obviously the first order if you want to reversed, its the way he looks telling you exactly who he is, you know its first impression. Silhouette! Ah, not cluttering the silhouette, having a really clean arena - at the same time making him mysterious. Understanding that designing Smaug you have to design Lonely Mountains, not Lonely Mountains, inside and out, because it will tell you who he is in a way that - to use a majority example - in the way that the first time you go inside: Tony Montana in a white suit walking in a marble palace - you know exactly who he is- the gold chains…

Anthony: Says it all…

Guillermo: It says it all! But people think it’s not true for monsters, and it is! The way I design monsters is that way. I design them so that if you can, in the best of circumstances, at first glimpse you know how they live. The moment you see the Faun in Pans Labyrinth and he has a flute tucked in a little err, by his side and he has a little wooden container full of faeries and is full of moss and earth, and he has runes carved into his own bodies and roots are growing out of him - you understand how he lives, where he lives, how ancient he is before he even says ‘My name is something so old that only the trees and the wind can pronounce it’. So the same way with Smaug there is already a breath of life from the book and you have to fulfil it. So that’s huge, but everything is. Everything is. The book demands that you make them believable, and that you make at least the name of the thirteen dwarves, the one’s that will have fully speaking parts as memorable, but officially you have a story of all of them, and not treat them as secondary characters. You have to treat them as, because that’s the delicate thing with the thirteen dwarves. The idea is you’re watching ‘The Magnificent Seven’ in the middle of the movie - they were recruited for a reason. So if all thirteen look kind of alike, and all thirteen - or worse even, if they all look too much unlike each other, you know, so you can almost differentiate them with tag, then that’s almost worse. So you have to strike a real balance so that when that group comes in those are the ‘Seven Samurai’ and you know by the way they interact with each other that he was chosen because he keeps vigil, he’s in command, this one is loyal, these two are fighting all the time but they’re willing to die for each other, blah, blah, blah - you have to make all that all on the run. Everything is a challenge. This is the hardest movie I’ll probably ever do. [pause] Movies!

Anthony: Movies - right. And umm…

Guillermo: … And frankly, I almost feel like saying ‘movie’. Because in my mind the narrative should still be the following [Anthony: "of 'a' piece"]…Of ‘a’ piece.

Anthony: As the trilogy is often referred to as a single…

Guillermo: If you ask me, the Trilogy is a movie.

Anthony: Shifting a little bit, although getting back to the emphasis on, and the importance of Smaug, I assume you’ve seen the Dark Knight and the way they mixed Imax footage in. There’s also been some chatter that you’re considering 3D for The Hobbit, it was mentioned alongside Avatar as one - Is that anything you can speak to, or?

Guillermo: I can say with absolute conviction, none of the above has been officially discussed, beyond like ‘coffee chat’. Really, and I think that it’s incredibly so, but way too early to talk about both. And we have so much to talk about which is more important than that. But if it has been discussed, it has been discussed in passing. I did discuss it with Jim Cameron [Guillermo laughs] [Anthony: "sure"]…But not within the group and we haven’t discussed it as a salient possibility in a way.
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Fri Sep 19, 2008 5:18 pm

OscarGuy wrote:It would require a strong advertising push, but it would also require a hugely talented director and screenwriter to put together, flesh out and make into a cohesive whole. Yes, it's a long book filled with several stories, but I think they could easily be brought to the medium.

Obviously, the only man for the job would have to be Peter Jackson, at least on writing duties. He'd probably have to hire another director, though. "Lonesome Dove"'s Simon Wincer perhaps? Or maybe even several directors, like they did with "Band of Brothers" (and maybe Peter Jackson and Guillermo del Toro could both direct an episode each -- and maybe even Fran Walsh could do one too).
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

jack
Assistant
Posts: 863
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

Postby jack » Thu Sep 18, 2008 6:56 pm

OscarGuy wrote:Well, personally, I disagree. I don't think The Silmarillion is really all that dense. The Bible has a lot more in it and is a much larger book. Besides, I think The Silmarillion could easily be done in miniseries format and I'm not talking the shitty two- to three-parters that get called miniseries today. I'm talking about something on the scale of Roots. And I disagree that it wouldn't be a big financial success. Think about it like this: It would be an event miniseries unparalleled in the history of television. It would draw in plenty of viewers who would want to see what exactly it is. It would require a strong advertising push, but it would also require a hugely talented director and screenwriter to put together, flesh out and make into a cohesive whole. Yes, it's a long book filled with several stories, but I think they could easily be brought to the medium.

I've always thought the same, Wes.

And if you want a director who could handle it all? I'm thinking Tobe Hooper.

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12553
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Thu Sep 18, 2008 4:55 pm

Well, personally, I disagree. I don't think The Silmarillion is really all that dense. The Bible has a lot more in it and is a much larger book. Besides, I think The Silmarillion could easily be done in miniseries format and I'm not talking the shitty two- to three-parters that get called miniseries today. I'm talking about something on the scale of Roots. And I disagree that it wouldn't be a big financial success. Think about it like this: It would be an event miniseries unparalleled in the history of television. It would draw in plenty of viewers who would want to see what exactly it is. It would require a strong advertising push, but it would also require a hugely talented director and screenwriter to put together, flesh out and make into a cohesive whole. Yes, it's a long book filled with several stories, but I think they could easily be brought to the medium.
Wesley Lovell
"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Sun Jun 01, 2008 9:14 am

From TheOneRing.net

Jack Black (and Guillermo Del Toro) deny “Hobbit” Rumors
May 31st, 2008 by Altaira

The names of Jack Black, James McAvoy and Daniel Radcliffe were making the rounds in the media this week, as rumors about who will be cast as Bilbo in the upcoming movie of “The Hobbit” begin to fly. According to Black, however, there’s no truth to that rumor. Black: “No, no. There’s no talk of it,” the comic proclaimed, denying the article’s validity. Of course, we could have told everyone that, as GDT posted the same thing on our message boards the day the original story came out:

“We will not choose casting until after we finish the scripts. Period. So, no- No talks are bound to take place with any actor to play Bilbo in the near future. Pages come first.” And, in another comment: “When its a fact- You’ll hear it from me first- and, very likely, right here.”




Edited By MovieWes on 1212329708
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

User avatar
MovieWes
Professor
Posts: 2019
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:33 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Contact:

Postby MovieWes » Sun Jun 01, 2008 9:10 am

Martin Freeman's name has been tossed around for months by fans. MTV.com even asked him if he'd been approached by the filmmakers, and he said no, but he'd do it if he was asked.
"Young men make wars and the virtues of war are the virtues of young men: courage and hope for the future. Then old men make the peace, and the vices of peace are the vices of old men: mistrust and caution." -- Alec Guinness (Lawrence of Arabia)

jack
Assistant
Posts: 863
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

Postby jack » Thu May 29, 2008 6:50 pm

I just don't buy McAvoy as Bilbo. Martin Freeman is Bilbo Baggins.

Look at this picture and then ask youself who else could be Bilbo.




Edited By jack on 1212105137

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12553
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Thu May 29, 2008 8:57 am

Jack Black's too fat for the role and Daniel Radcliffe I don't think would jump into another fantasy vehicle so soon. He's already attempting to branch out (Equus). So, I think McAvoy's a good bet, but would he accept?
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

User avatar
Zahveed
Associate
Posts: 1838
Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2007 1:47 pm
Location: In Your Head
Contact:

Postby Zahveed » Thu May 29, 2008 8:44 am

OscarGuy wrote:Daniel Radcliffe and Jack Black

Harry Potter and the Kung Fu Panda up for Bilbo Baggins? That's crazy.
"It's the least most of us can do, but less of us will do more."

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12553
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Thu May 29, 2008 8:36 am

Hmm, I could see it working...

McAvoy Tipped For Hobbit Role
29 May 2008 12:09 AM, PDT

Scottish actor James McAvoy has been tipped to take the lead role in the new movie version of Lord Of The Rings prequel The Hobbit.

J.R.R. Tolkien's novel is set to be turned into a major blockbuster under the direction of Guillermo del Toro and filming is due to begin in New Zealand later this year.

Sir Ian McKellen will reprise his role as Gandalf and McAvoy is rumoured to be the favourite to take the lead role of hobbit Bilbo Baggins.

The character was played by Ian Holm in the previous films of the fantasy franchise, but he is due to be replaced by a high profile star for the new movie.

A source tells British newspaper the Daily Express, "A number of names have been doing the rounds, including Daniel Radcliffe and Jack Black, but James (McAvoy) is the one the film's bosses really want.

"They're expected to have talks soon so hopefully it could be confirmed in the not too distant future."

And director del Toro adds, "I can tell you it's down to a few names that we all agree upon. For our first choice, completely magically we all have the same name."
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

User avatar
OscarGuy
Site Admin
Posts: 12553
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 12:22 am
Location: Springfield, MO
Contact:

Postby OscarGuy » Wed May 28, 2008 4:49 pm

I think that idea flashed in my mind when I first saw him in Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I think he would be a wise choice and it would continue in the tradition of using mostly British or Kiwi performers.
Wesley Lovell

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

jack
Assistant
Posts: 863
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

Postby jack » Wed May 28, 2008 4:43 pm

Does anyone else think Martin Freeman would be a perfect Bilbo?

[edit] I just found this picture, so I'm not theonly one who thinks so:

Code: Select all

http://www.herr-der-ringe-film.de/v2/media/galerie/sonstiges10/HobbitFakePoster.jpg




Edited By jack on 1212011160

jack
Assistant
Posts: 863
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

Postby jack » Wed May 28, 2008 4:06 pm

Dosen't Saul Zeants own the movie lisencing rights to Tolkien's work? If I remember correctly it was Zeants who lisenced the rights to New Line (he even sued them for x-amount of un-paid royalties). The Tolkien family should have no real say in this matter. When Zeants dies the rights will revert back to the family, I'm assuming.

User avatar
flipp525
Laureate
Posts: 5834
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2003 7:44 am

Postby flipp525 » Wed May 28, 2008 3:37 pm

Oh, god. I hope this entire project is delayed and/or held up in litigation. B-O-R-I-N-G.
"The mantle of spinsterhood was definitely in her shoulders. She was twenty five and looked it."

-Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell


Return to “2012”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest