Gravity reviews

Okri
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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Okri » Sun Nov 10, 2013 2:13 pm

Yeah, if it wins screenplay, the night is over for it will be sweeping. I'd still say the screenplay is the longest shot of it's chances for a nomination.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Greg » Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:37 pm

Big Magilla wrote:As for the film's Oscar chances, I can see four wins - visual effects, sound and two for Cuaron himself, original screenplay and editing. I don't see Cuaron winning for Best Picture and Director, although that could certainly happen with the fickle Academy who, in the end, may find 12 Years a Slave too much of a bitter pill to swallow. I, for one, would not be upset with a turn of events that acknowledges the director of A Little Princess; Y Tu Mama Tambien and Children of Men, and producer of Pan's Labyrinth, with four golden guys of his own even if they happen to be for the wrong film.
:oops:


You don't see Gravity winning cinematography, which is probably its biggest lock after visual effects and a win that probably even Italiano and Uri think is deserved?
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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby mlrg » Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:04 am

OscarGuy wrote:Sorry, Uri. I don't see someone who's constantly telling others that they are wrong or that their opinions are inferior to theirs as being someone I particularly want to engage with. Film is a living, breathing medium that grows for each person depending on their views of the world. Art is in the eye of the beholder and pushing your opinion on someone and expecting them to bow down to your opinion as if it were manna sent down from Heaven to nourish others is condescending.

I don't have the time or patience anymore to deal with that type of attitude. I will continue to expand and explore my personal views of film and the movies I love and will gladly engage in debate where discussion opens each person up to new ideas and new ways of understanding the medium and the subjects it explores. Opening that up and then having it utterly rejected without thought becomes annoying. So, I will treat those as they treat me and dismiss everything they say as not worthy of my time or worthy of informed, exploratory discussion.


Agreed 100%. And thinking otherwise is acting like a prima donna.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Okri » Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:38 am

Uri wrote:Thank you. I’m the last to deny my inner Sally Field – I really want to be liked. But I was not only trying to milk compliments. For me the reason for posting here is having a group of people, who create an intelligent communal consciousness I can relate to based on shared interests (and, by now, also a shared history), as an intellectual wall onto which I can throw my ideas, wondering at what angel and what intensity they’d bounce back. And throwing a ball at what feels like a very soft surface lately is not fun.


What ideas did you want people to engage with?

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby ITALIANO » Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:07 am

OscarGuy wrote: Art is in the eye of the beholder.



Are you sure Oscar Guy? Really really sure? So all of us who have studied art, the philosophy of art, and aesthetic theories, have only wasted our time. Good to know.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby OscarGuy » Sun Nov 10, 2013 7:54 am

Sorry, Uri. I don't see someone who's constantly telling others that they are wrong or that their opinions are inferior to theirs as being someone I particularly want to engage with. Film is a living, breathing medium that grows for each person depending on their views of the world. Art is in the eye of the beholder and pushing your opinion on someone and expecting them to bow down to your opinion as if it were manna sent down from Heaven to nourish others is condescending.

I don't have the time or patience anymore to deal with that type of attitude. I will continue to expand and explore my personal views of film and the movies I love and will gladly engage in debate where discussion opens each person up to new ideas and new ways of understanding the medium and the subjects it explores. Opening that up and then having it utterly rejected without thought becomes annoying. So, I will treat those as they treat me and dismiss everything they say as not worthy of my time or worthy of informed, exploratory discussion.
Wesley Lovell
"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby ITALIANO » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:57 am

Reza wrote:
Uri wrote:I do believe that in the last decade or so the kind of cinema I used to champion, meaning intelligent, meaningful, adult American mainstream is all but gone.


Totally agree with you. Stuff like Argo, Gravity, 12 Years a Slave (surely this similar to portions of Roots, just more violence, nudity and sex? Been there seen that countless times before. It's just that we haven't seen it for some time on the screen only this time it's a black director at the helm. Nevertheless it's old wine in new bottles) and many more being treated like the second coming by the American press. Mediocre films being lavishly praised.


I havent seen 12 Years a Slave yet, so I hope that it's better than the others you mentioned - it's certainly directed by someone who has made interesting movies before, which makes me feel optimistic. But yes, I think that the fact that Gravity is considered to be a masterpiece is partly due to ignorance, but also partly to the fact that the general level of American cinema today is really low, so someone who only a few years ago could find enthusiasm for Mulholland Drive, today must fall in love for... Gravity with Sandra Bullock! I think this says alot.

American cinema was one of the best - this is a fact. Great movies, really. But except for a few really talented directors (Malick, Anderson, etc.), today if one wants to see something even vaguely profound or intelligent or original, one can only go to European movies, or, probably even more, to Asian and African ones.

And Gravity's endings is clearly a typical "happy" one, let's be honest.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:55 am

That's because you see the cup half full. :D
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Reza » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:41 am

Big Magilla wrote:
Reza wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:Gravity, beyond the special effects, is a film about existentialism and nihilism. Granted, it's more "fiction" than "science", but the ending is supposed to make you think. Bullock's character has landed, but where has she landed? Will she be found, and if so, by whom? Is she safe or isn't she? I suppose it's an "is the cup half full or half empty" question, but let's hope we never find out. I shudder to think that a lesser talent than Cuaron could make a sequel that would rival Bullock's Speed 2 in ineptitude.


Really? I didn't get that at all. She crash landed, swam to shore and I automatically assumed she would be found by someone eventually. Are we supposed to assume she's on some other planet? That's too Star Trek for me, I'm sorry. Has Cuaron stated that's what he implied in his screenplay or are critics reading far too much into the plot just for the sake of being hip?

No, not some other planet, but where on Earth has she landed?


Who knows? I don't care. It's earth and she will be found. It's just that we are so used to usually seeing NASA guiding vessels down with scenes of people behind computers looking busy and a boat waiting for the splash down that seems to have confused many into probably reading too much into the end.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Reza » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:40 am

Uri wrote:I do believe that in the last decade or so the kind of cinema I used to champion, meaning intelligent, meaningful, adult American mainstream is all but gone.


Totally agree with you. Stuff like Argo, Gravity, 12 Years a Slave (surely this similar to portions of Roots, just more violence, nudity and sex? Been there seen that countless times before. It's just that we haven't seen it for some time on the screen only this time it's a black director at the helm. Nevertheless it's old wine in new bottles) and many more being treated like the second coming by the American press. Mediocre films being lavishly praised.

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:33 am

Reza wrote:
Big Magilla wrote:Gravity, beyond the special effects, is a film about existentialism and nihilism. Granted, it's more "fiction" than "science", but the ending is supposed to make you think. Bullock's character has landed, but where has she landed? Will she be found, and if so, by whom? Is she safe or isn't she? I suppose it's an "is the cup half full or half empty" question, but let's hope we never find out. I shudder to think that a lesser talent than Cuaron could make a sequel that would rival Bullock's Speed 2 in ineptitude.


Really? I didn't get that at all. She crash landed, swam to shore and I automatically assumed she would be found by someone eventually. Are we supposed to assume she's on some other planet? That's too Star Trek for me, I'm sorry. Has Cuaron stated that's what he implied in his screenplay or are critics reading far too much into the plot just for the sake of being hip?

No, not some other planet, but where on Earth has she landed?
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:33 am

ITALIANO wrote:Now we even have the (American, and it shows) catholic priest - and of course, as we all know, the catholic church is a reliable authority on movies! - praising Gravity for its deep spiritual content. (This is the most absurd connection between religion and cinema since the time of that priest that campaigned to make Grace Kelly a saint). i hope you all realize how crazy this is becoming (but of course, like in other cases - Dreamgirls comes to mind - you will all say "Italiano you were right" only after a few years).


I don't think the priest is speaking for the Catholic Church per se, but I wouldn't be surprised to find the film on the Vatican's official list of recommended films. The religious themes are there to find, if you look hard enough. It may be grasping at straws, but those who look for religion in mainstream films have not had anything to cheer about in recent times. There have been the veiled references in the Lord of the Rings and Narnia films, and Cuaron's Children of Men, but aside from Mel Gibson's despicable Passion of the Christ, there hasn't been an overtly mainstream religious film since 1988 when we had three - Wings of Desire; Babette's Feast and The Last Temptation of Christ.
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Reza » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:31 am

Big Magilla wrote:Gravity, beyond the special effects, is a film about existentialism and nihilism. Granted, it's more "fiction" than "science", but the ending is supposed to make you think. Bullock's character has landed, but where has she landed? Will she be found, and if so, by whom? Is she safe or isn't she? I suppose it's an "is the cup half full or half empty" question, but let's hope we never find out. I shudder to think that a lesser talent than Cuaron could make a sequel that would rival Bullock's Speed 2 in ineptitude.


Really? I didn't get that at all. She crash landed, swam to shore and I automatically assumed she would be found by someone eventually. Are we supposed to assume she's on some other planet? That's too Star Trek for me, I'm sorry. Has Cuaron stated that's what he implied in his screenplay or are critics reading far too much into the plot just for the sake of being hip?

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Big Magilla » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:17 am

Uri wrote:I do believe that in the last decade or so the kind of cinema I used to champion, meaning intelligent, meaningful, adult American mainstream is all but gone. I mourn it, but I’m not going to disillusioned myself in order to maintain what was a significant part of my life, meaning following the Oscars, as valid as it was. I guess that when I ridicule the likes of Gravity I do ridicule any universe in which such a film can be taken seriously, and therefore challenging the whole point of being emotionally invested in an award culture which is supposed to reflect such a universe. Sorry for being such a party pooper, but it is a heartfelt sentiment and the only one I’m capable of manifesting.


In general, certainly true, but you have to look beyond the obvious with Cuaron, who is one of the deeper thinkers working in film today. Gravity, beyond the special effects, is a film about existentialism and nihilism. Granted, it's more "fiction" than "science", but the ending is supposed to make you think. Bullock's character has landed, but where has she landed? Will she be found, and if so, by whom? Is she safe or isn't she? I suppose it's an "is the cup half full or half empty" question, but let's hope we never find out. I shudder to think that a lesser talent than Cuaron could make a sequel that would rival Bullock's Speed 2 in ineptitude.

As for the film's Oscar chances, I can see four wins - visual effects, sound and two for Cuaron himself, original screenplay and editing. I don't see Cuaron winning for Best Picture and Director, although that could certainly happen with the fickle Academy who, in the end, may find 12 Years a Slave too much of a bitter pill to swallow. I, for one, would not be upset with a turn of events that acknowledges the director of A Little Princess; Y Tu Mama Tambien and Children of Men, and producer of Pan's Labyrinth, with four golden guys of his own even if they happen to be for the wrong film.
:oops:
“‎Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.” - Voltaire

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Re: Gravity reviews

Postby Uri » Sun Nov 10, 2013 4:07 am

The Original BJ wrote:
Uri wrote:One more thing, although I’m not sure there’s a point for me posting here, since lately I feel that whenever I do, it’s like shouting into a void (and admittedly, I have been mostly shouting, but I believe for a good reason).


I always enjoy reading your comments. Is that enough of a point to keep posting here?


Thank you. I’m the last to deny my inner Sally Field – I really want to be liked. But I was not only trying to milk compliments. For me the reason for posting here is having a group of people, who create an intelligent communal consciousness I can relate to based on shared interests (and, by now, also a shared history), as an intellectual wall onto which I can throw my ideas, wondering at what angel and what intensity they’d bounce back. And throwing a ball at what feels like a very soft surface lately is not fun.

And OscarGuy – for me this place is not about self improving. I’m not “using” you to correct myself or my views, but as an incentive, a motivator for me to formulate my thoughts for you to get them and therefore, in that process, to make them clearer for myself. No, I don’t want to be converted, thank you very much, but then again, looking around, I don’t really think most of the people here do. It’s not like we’re a bunch of shrinking violets, at least when it comes to our cinematic tastes. But I must admit your statement did strike a chord with me. Why are you so antagonized by my views, why do you feel obliged to apply this right/wrong dichotomy to them and not, say, to Eric’s, whose agenda seems to be far more remote from yours?

When it comes to Cinema, my approach, probably my abilities to absorbed it, and therefore my preferences, are rather middlebrow. For God’s sake, I find Out of Africa to be a worthy film and a rather worthy Oscar winner. You can bet your life I will never name a 10 minutes avant-garde film as an alternative for a best picture. I want my films to be accessible, reasonably meaningful, tastefully lengthened and I really don’t mind having some movie stars thrown in too. (Hell, Stanley Kramer would have been my hero had he made good films). My point? When it comes to film appreciation (and the Oscars), I’m not a contrarian, or at least I don’t fancy myself to be one. I’m really one who should have at least liked many of the widely praised films out there. But I don’t, and yes, I do believe I’m right. I do believe that in the last decade or so the kind of cinema I used to champion, meaning intelligent, meaningful, adult American mainstream is all but gone. I mourn it, but I’m not going to disillusioned myself in order to maintain what was a significant part of my life, meaning following the Oscars, as valid as it was. I guess that when I ridicule the likes of Gravity I do ridicule any universe in which such a film can be taken seriously, and therefore challenging the whole point of being emotionally invested in an award culture which is supposed to reflect such a universe. Sorry for being such a party pooper, but it is a heartfelt sentiment and the only one I’m capable of manifesting.


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